Legion Logistics https://jointhelegion.com We'll Move Just About Anything. Within Reason. OK, Anything Fri, 24 May 2019 13:23:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.1.1 We like to plan. https://jointhelegion.com/we-like-to-plan/ Thu, 23 May 2019 18:57:04 +0000 http://jointhelegion.com/?p=6069 WIn today’s work of just-in-time inventory and incredibly tight supply chains, route planning is more important than ever. Fewer customers are receiving full truckloads of freight, and more and more drivers are having to make multiple stops on their routes. But planning routes, whether they are regular or just every once in a while, is …

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WIn today’s work of just-in-time inventory and incredibly tight supply chains, route planning is more important than ever. Fewer customers are receiving full truckloads of freight, and more and more drivers are having to make multiple stops on their routes. But planning routes, whether they are regular or just every once in a while, is incredibly difficult – especially so if the route is in an area you aren’t familiar with.

That’s where Legion can help. We have the knowledge, experience and expertise to help you plan routes for all your deliveries, whether you have two drops or 10, and whether you are delivering bottled water or mattresses.

Some of our earliest experience in route planning came about accidentally. We had a customer in the Pacific Northwest who was moving single-pick, multi-drop loads through three states. After moving a few of these loads for them, we realized that if they re-ordered a few of their deliveries, the process would move much more smoothly, therefore saving them money. (It helps that our sales manager used to be a truck driver responsible for planning his own routes, and brings a decade and a half of that experience to us.)

Once we’d fixed that route, we tackled others for that customer, and then started analyzing the routes for all our customers with multi-pick or multi-drop freight. We’ve managed to save these customers hundreds of man-hours (which is even more important now in the age of electronic logs) and money on fuel, detention, unloading and delays.

If you have complicated freight routes that you aren’t sure you are optimizing fully, reach out. We’d love to take a look and see how our experience and know-how can help.

By Lacy Starling, President and Fearless Leader

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It’s not just freight – it’s your livelihood. https://jointhelegion.com/its-not-just-freight-its-your-livelihood/ Wed, 15 May 2019 18:25:48 +0000 http://jointhelegion.com/?p=6025 Ten years ago, when I first started brokering freight, I had a customer who made shaving cream and was trying to get it on the shelves in Bed Bath & Beyond and CVS. He’d never shipped more than a few small boxes at a time, and was suddenly looking at sending half a truckload of …

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Ten years ago, when I first started brokering freight, I had a customer who made shaving cream and was trying to get it on the shelves in Bed Bath & Beyond and CVS. He’d never shipped more than a few small boxes at a time, and was suddenly looking at sending half a truckload of shaving cream across the country to a distribution center in New Jersey. This shipment was incredibly important, not only because it was his shot at national sales and distribution, but also because all his working capital was tied up in this one order. If something went wrong, if his product was damaged or lost or destroyed, or we didn’t get the order to where it needed to be on time and they canceled it, he was finished.

I tell that story every time a new Problem Solver starts at Legion. It’s easy, sometimes, to forget the people behind the freight. To us, because we never see them in person, the loads of vegetables or car parts or shaving cream are just abstract – they are words and numbers on paper, but not real. It helps to remind ourselves sometimes that this freight is very, very real for our customers, and sometimes it represents a lifetime of work, or someone’s life savings.

We understand that what goes on our trucks isn’t just freight – it’s your livelihood. That helps us stay focused and do whatever it takes in order to get your freight delivered on time, and as expected. We treat your freight as if it were our own, and we update you on its progress, because we understand why it is so important for you to know where it is and when it will arrive. And as for my shaving cream customer – he got the order, and many more after that. And now, every time I walk into the drug store, I take a trip down the shaving supplies aisle so I can see his product on the shelf and know that I played some small role in getting it there.

By Lacy Starling, President and Fearless Leader

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We Work Fast https://jointhelegion.com/we-work-fast/ Wed, 24 Apr 2019 16:23:11 +0000 http://jointhelegion.com/?p=5850 One of the (many) benefits of having more than 33,000 carriers in our database is that we can find a driver pretty much anywhere in the United States on very short notice. This comes in handy every day, but especially on a day when one of our customers has a true emergency. We’ve gotten lots …

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One of the (many) benefits of having more than 33,000 carriers in our database is that we can find a driver pretty much anywhere in the United States on very short notice. This comes in handy every day, but especially on a day when one of our customers has a true emergency.

We’ve gotten lots of these calls over the years – a customer had given a load to another carrier, and they either had a breakdown and couldn’t pick up the freight, or had promised capacity they couldn’t deliver. Now, that customer has to move their freight, and quickly. At this point, they often have less than two hours to get a driver into the pickup location to get the freight on the road so it can deliver on time.

When these calls come in, we turn on the machine. We dive into our database, get on the phones, and find a driver out of the tens of thousands we have in order to get a truck to your location as quickly as possible. Often, we can have a driver there within 30 minutes, and we’ll make sure he or she is fresh on hours to ensure we can make your deliveries on time.

Now, we hope you don’t just call us when you have an emergency – we like to have a little more time to work on loads, and we can usually get you a better price if we have more than 10 minutes’ notice, but if you find yourself in a bind, give us a call. We’ll get someone rolling to you as fast as we can.

By Lacy Starling, President and Fearless Leader

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We Don’t Screen Our Calls https://jointhelegion.com/we-dont-screen-our-calls/ Wed, 17 Apr 2019 18:23:41 +0000 http://jointhelegion.com/?p=5846 I think we can all agree that one of the worst feelings in the world is having a question for one of your vendors and not being able to get anyone to answer the phone to sort things out. We’ve all been sucked into that vicious cycle of phone tag and voice mails and having …

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I think we can all agree that one of the worst feelings in the world is having a question for one of your vendors and not being able to get anyone to answer the phone to sort things out. We’ve all been sucked into that vicious cycle of phone tag and voice mails and having issues linger for weeks while we try to get in touch with the right person. And it’s even worse when the issue is acute – say you have a truck that was supposed to deliver at midnight, and now it is 2 a.m. and you can’t get any answers.

With Legion, you never have to worry if someone is going to answer your call, or who that might be. As soon as you start working with us, your Problem Solver will give you his or her cell phone number with strict instructions to call anytime you have a question. Whether it’s two in the afternoon or two in the morning, your Problem Solver will answer your call, and answer your questions. You won’t be sent off to a call center where no one can give you any tracking information or tell you why your freight is late, and you won’t have to leave a voicemail (unless your Problem Solver is on the other line, working to solve your problem.)

And to go along with that, we train our folks to get ahead of issues. If we know there is a breakdown, or a traffic slowdown, or a weather issue, our Problem Solvers are proactive, calling their customers and explaining what the issue is and what we are doing to solve it. Our favorite saying around the office is “Bad news doesn’t get better with time.” So when we have bad news, we deliver it early, coupled with a solution, and a revised ETA, so you don’t have to worry about what’s happening or when your freight will arrive.

It all goes back to the basic idea that we should treat our customers the way we want to be treated. And for us, that means prompt, accessible customer service from your dedicated team.

By Lacy Starling, President and Fearless Leader

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Legion Logistics Makes First Acquisition https://jointhelegion.com/legion-logistics-makes-first-aquisition/ Mon, 14 Jan 2019 13:53:21 +0000 http://jointhelegion.com/?p=5416 Florence, KY – Legion Logistics has acquired Qontinuity Enterprises, LLC, a third-party logistics brokerage based in Dandridge, Tennessee. Legion will grow more than 10 percent with the addition of Qontinuity. All operations will be based in Florence, Kentucky, where Legion has its headquarters. This acquisition is the first step in an ongoing growth plan for …

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Florence, KY – Legion Logistics has acquired Qontinuity Enterprises, LLC, a third-party logistics brokerage based in Dandridge, Tennessee.


Legion will grow more than 10 percent with the addition of Qontinuity. All operations will be based in Florence, Kentucky, where Legion has its headquarters. This acquisition is the first step in an ongoing growth plan for Legion.


“We’ve spent the last year talking to many different companies, trying to find one that was the right fit for Legion,” said Lacy Starling, Legion’s President and Fearless Leader. “Qontinuity checks all our boxes – they are hardworking, ethical, and knowledgeable and they bring a host of additional services to Legion that we can now offer our customers.”


Qontinuity, founded in 2010 by Michael Archual, is, like Legion, a service disabled veteran-owned small business. They specialize in servicing federal and state government transportation contracts, as well as the automotive and building products industries. Archual will stay on with Legion as their Executive Director of Business Development.


“I’m excited to join the Legion family, knowing they share my philosophy of putting the customer first and doing what is fair and honest,” said Archual. “I look forward to our continued success together.”


Legion Logistics, LLC is a service disabled veteran-owned third-party logistics provider (3PL) based in Florence, Kentucky. What all those hyphens don’t tell you is that Legion is committed to exceptional customer service, fair dealings with trucking companies and an outstanding, veteran-friendly work environment. Founded in 2009, Legion specializes in full truckload, less-than-truckload, government freight, hazardous materials and produce shipping. Learn more at jointhelegion.com.

For more information please contact Lacy Starling at lacy@jointhelegion.com

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The Zen of an Empty Calendar https://jointhelegion.com/the-zen-of-an-empty-calendar/ Thu, 29 Nov 2018 20:22:51 +0000 http://jointhelegion.com/?p=5384 A weird thing is happening to me this week. I keep getting caught up. My email inbox is completely empty, my to-do lists are crossed off, my errands are even getting done. It’s like I’ve entered some kind of weird Twilight Zone where efficiency intersects with the natural late-summer slowness that takes over every year …

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A weird thing is happening to me this week. I keep getting caught up. My email inbox is completely empty, my to-do lists are crossed off, my errands are even getting done. It’s like I’ve entered some kind of weird Twilight Zone where efficiency intersects with the natural late-summer slowness that takes over every year when everyone is on vacation and no one wants to have meetings.

It actually started last week. I had an all-day meeting Wednesday, followed by taking Thursday off to spend with my daughter at King’s Island (If you ever want to be reminded how old you really are, go to a theme park for a day. The resulting aches and pains will help you understand exactly how much less resilient you are at 37 than at 7. Catherine was fine. I felt like I’d been beaten with a baseball bat.) I had a stack of things waiting at work that needed done, but I just couldn’t get myself motivated to knock all of them out on Friday. (Probably because I had a mild concussion from multiple rides on The Beast.) So Sunday, I pulled out my laptop, wrote a few documents, responded to a handful of emails that had been lingering, and put together a detailed to-do list for Monday, so I could come in to the office and attack the day.

Monday morning, I woke up and looked at my calendar. I had literally no meetings scheduled – nothing but an open day to work on my tasks in the office. I knew the day could go one of two ways – I could piddle around, reading stuff online and putting off actual work all day, and go home feeling frustrated and stagnated at 4:30, or I could charge into the office, knock out my to-do list, clear my in-box, and feel like I’d accomplished something. Thankfully, I chose the second path. By 2 p.m., I was at inbox zero, my desk was cleaned off, and I’d even tackled an HR issue I’d been putting off for weeks. At 2:20, I looked around, realized I’d done all the good I could that day, and headed home to weed my flowerbeds, a chore that I’d been putting off doing since….March.

But then something else happened. I was able to maintain inbox zero. Monday evening, after the landscaping work was done and dinner was in the books, I logged back in, saw I had a dozen or so emails, and cleared them out – sending responses where needed and delegating or deleting the rest. Tuesday morning I came into the office committed to maintaining my pristine inbox. And it worked. I walked out of the office yesterday with no emails waiting, plus I’d run a couple of those pain-in-the-ass errands that you put off for weeks until you get too embarrassed to actually do them – closing old bank accounts, depositing a four-month-old cashier’s check, etc. When I got to work Wednesday, I looked at my calendar, realized I had another day empty of commitments, but also nothing left on my to-do list. It was a solid moment of cognitive dissonance as I wondered what I was supposed to do with my day. Eight hours of open space stretched in front of me.

There is a zen to all this, but also an underlying terror that has to be addressed for a workaholic like me.  The goal has always been inbox zero, and being caught up on my tasks. That’s what capable humans do, or at least that’s what I’ve always believed capable humans do. But I’ve never gotten there. This is not a state I’ve existed in before, nor is it one that is particularly comfortable for me. I was raised in a house where leisure time was not prized. If you weren’t doing homework or housework or farmwork, well, you were probably asleep. The few times I can remember just sitting and doing nothing as a child was when it was too hot to work outside and all the housework inside was done. I still get twitchy thinking about the laundry or the dishes if I’m taking the time to read a book or watch a movie – there’s a strong feeling that our value as humans only comes from our work output, a feeling that I think most children of working-class parents share.

But I’ve also come to realize that the next great thing, whatever that is, won’t happen if I’m constantly mired in busywork. If I don’t give myself time to think, and explore new ideas and rest, for crap’s sake, I won’t be able to be the leader Legion needs me to be going forward. For too long, I prized working until I burned out over everything, until I realized that there were only so many rotations I could take on that particular ride before I just quit everything.  And the mental weight of lingering emails, long to-do lists and things left undone interferes with me being able to think freely about bigger issues. I need to embrace the open space, the stillness, the lack of pressing tasks, and see what develops. This is time to read, reflect, and power up for the second half of the year.

Because I know it won’t always be like this. School will start, people will want to have meetings with me again, work will pick back up, emails will pile up after vacations or days off. But when I can, I need to capture this time and see what comes of it. It might be nothing, or it might be the best idea ever. But if I don’t give myself breathing room, I’ll never know.

 

By Lacy Starling, President and Fearless Leader

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Touch it Once https://jointhelegion.com/touch-it-once/ Tue, 20 Nov 2018 17:36:34 +0000 http://jointhelegion.com/?p=5381 I hate clutter and mess. I hate losing things, or missing appointments, or forgetting about things, or misplacing things. I have this vision of my perfect life, where every counter is clean, every drawer organized, every to-do list finished at the end of the day, and every email inbox a pristine white canvas, just waiting …

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I hate clutter and mess. I hate losing things, or missing appointments, or forgetting about things, or misplacing things. I have this vision of my perfect life, where every counter is clean, every drawer organized, every to-do list finished at the end of the day, and every email inbox a pristine white canvas, just waiting for the next message to arrive, and I arrive to all of my appointments five minutes early, perfectly prepared. I meditate on clean counters like some people do on crashing ocean waves, or babbling brooks. My fantasy is hundreds of linear miles of uncluttered countertop, a clean desk, inbox zero and all my clothes folded like Marie Kondo just spent a weekend at my house.

My reality is constant, brutal trench warfare on stacks of mail and school papers and library books and whatever piles of crap my kid discards in a constant, endless stream in every direction. She’s like a firehose of clutter. And glitter. Sometimes glittery clutter. Keeping my house in order is an unending battle against an enemy as committed to her cause (never ever cleaning anything up, ever ever) as I am to mine (throwing away absolutely everything as quickly as possible, especially slime.)

And the office isn’t much better. People drop things on my desk throughout the day, some of which I have to action and some of which is just stuff they were carrying when they came into my office and then decided they didn’t want anymore. And there are times when I’ve piled stuff on my desk myself, dropping off the agenda and notes from one meeting as I breeze through on my way to the next, or setting paperwork that needs to be filled out to the side, to deal with later.

So how do I make any progress toward my zen in a world where papers and toys and hair ties seem to reproduce the minute I look away, and I fear being buried in drifts of permission slips and school menus like some lonely spinster on “Hoarders?” If you know me at all, the answer is pretty simple – I take action.

A few years ago, I read Getting Things Done by David Allen. If I’m being honest, at this point I don’t remember much of the book, and I probably need to go back and re-read it, but the one thing that has stuck out for me since then is Allen’s philosophy that if you can action something in two minutes, you should just do it, not set it aside for later. He also believes in touching something only once, and either doing it, delegating it, or discarding it.

So often, we look at the same emails in our inbox over and over because actioning them (either responding or forwarding on to the person who SHOULD respond) seems like a pain. There are fiddly administrative tasks like setting a time for a training or signing a document and scanning it back to someone that drive me bonkers, and I’ll sometimes put those emails off for days, even though it would take me less than two minutes to just DO the thing and be able to delete the email.

I’m even worse about papers that need to be filled out. I HATE permission slips and medical release forms and whatever else comes home from school with Catherine. (It’s something I’ve come to accept about myself – I have low follow-through on my Kolbe test, something I can discuss with anyone who’d like to understand me better.) I’ll let a form go until the absolute last minute instead of just filling it out as soon as I see it.

But, ironically, this postponement of action stresses me out. Seeing the stacks of paperwork and the list of emails that require minor action makes me feel like I’m not living up to my ethos of reducing clutter in my life. I’m letting things pile up that shouldn’t, and therefore, I’m not being true to myself. So when I see this happening, I recommit to the program of touching things once. When I check my email, I immediately action the little stuff – forwarding, responding, printing and signing and scanning – and then move on with a clear mind. If people bring me something to sign – whether it’s a card or a contract – I do it immediately and hand it back, so it’s not taking up physical and mental space for me anymore. When Catherine comes home from school, I open her folder, ooh and ahh at her test scores before throwing ALL the non-essential papers away, and immediately fill out and put back in the folder the permission slips, sign-up sheets, reading logs and discipline reports that have to go back. Touch it once.  Action it immediately.

Of course, there are emails and papers and interactions that require more time and thought. I’ll let an email that is going to require research and thought and consideration sit in my inbox for a little while, until I can set aside some time to fully apply myself to it. Actioning things immediately does not mean half-assing them. It means giving priority to the big stuff while taking care of the little stuff the first time it shows up, instead of allowing it to circle back on you again and again like a horse on a carousel.

When I’m in this mode, my days are happier and easier. I’m not dealing with residual stress from the pile of unfinished tasks on my desk and I don’t wake up in the morning in a panic, wondering if I’ve signed Catherine’s reading log from the night before. I feel more in control of my world, because I AM more in control of my world. Instead of letting the piles of stuff manage me, I’m managing them.

Now, if I could just find someone who could train my seven-year-old on this stuff, then I’d be truly set.

 

By Lacy Starling, President and Fearless Leader

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Stick to a Budget https://jointhelegion.com/stick-to-a-budget/ Thu, 15 Nov 2018 17:03:43 +0000 http://jointhelegion.com/?p=5375 Growing up in a blue collar town, I’ve seen people struggle and live paycheck to paycheck.  Many may think that growing up that way is a negative experience, but I think it was positive. That blue-collar mentality is something I will always carry with me.  They never had a trust fund to fall back on, …

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Growing up in a blue collar town, I’ve seen people struggle and live paycheck to paycheck.  Many may think that growing up that way is a negative experience, but I think it was positive. That blue-collar mentality is something I will always carry with me.  They never had a trust fund to fall back on, never look for handouts, they wake up and do what they have to do to make a living.

No matter who you are, where you are, or how much money you make – there are so many people who never set a budget, or focus on having savings.  People always joke that they will be working until the day they die, which could be a reality if you don’t make a budget and stick to it!

Every December, I sit down in front of my computer with Google sheets pulled up and begin preparing our budget for the upcoming year.

  1. Income – I plug in our household income and then go through last year’s taxes to get a rough estimate on how much was taken out. On average, we deduct 25% from our annual household income right off the top before we do anything else. I also divide our annual net income by twelve, so we can see how much we make per month.
  2. Expenses – Once we see our net income, I begin listing all of our expenses. One thing many of us don’t include is miscellaneous expenses such as entertainment, repairs, doctor visits, etc.  This could throw off your budget in a big way if you don’t account for it at the beginning of the year.
  3. Savings – After we have our income, and expenses sorted out, I like to move to savings. When I work on our savings, I update how much we have in our savings from what we had listed the previous years.  In this section, I also like to list assets, such as how much equity we have in our home, or the value of our cars.
  4. Retirement Goal – This is the fun part, this is where I plug in a formula based on how much we plan to save each year, and add interest/investment projections into the spreadsheet as well. It is very important to set a retirement goal when setting a budget because it gives you something to look forward to and makes it less likely for you to blow your budget.

I hope this encourages you to begin working on a budget for 2019 if you haven’t done so already!

 

By Kyle Kosco, Marketing Coordinator & Director of Internships

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The Great Work from Home Experiment https://jointhelegion.com/the-great-work-from-home-experiment/ Thu, 08 Nov 2018 17:51:30 +0000 http://jointhelegion.com/?p=5372 A few months ago, at a meeting of women business owners, one of them said something that changed my perspective on work, and my office, and my job. This woman, who is incredibly wise and has gone through many career transitions, is the CEO of a multi-office staffing agency – and those multiple offices are …

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A few months ago, at a meeting of women business owners, one of them said something that changed my perspective on work, and my office, and my job. This woman, who is incredibly wise and has gone through many career transitions, is the CEO of a multi-office staffing agency – and those multiple offices are in multiple states. It’s a large enterprise and she has big responsibilities. We were discussing how, throughout all our days, we are interrupted regularly, and it is hard for us to focus and get the big work done – strategy, creative work, deep dives into thinking about the future. And then this executive, in her wise way, explained to us her perspective on working in the office.

“I don’t go to the office to work,” she said. “I go to the office to interact with people – to giggle with the receptionist, to talk with people about their vacations, to hear what people have to say about the work, and themselves. When I want to work, I go somewhere else, quiet, so I can focus.”

Mind. Blown.

Every day I’m at Legion, my office might as well have a revolving door on it. People flow in and out all day long, and there are times when I look up and I have five people in my tiny office, and sometimes, they aren’t even talking to me. They are having their own meeting, it just happens to be in my office. People come in to talk about problems they are having, their weekend plans, issues that need resolving at the office (and sometimes at home), and to ask about my latest trip, since I’m traveling a lot lately. The joke is that the minute my lunch arrives, my sales manager has a light on his desk that goes off and he comes in to talk to me about something, while I try to gracefully eat a salad or a bowl of soup without getting half of it on my shirt. (I’m rarely successful.)

And when I’m not hosting a party in my office, I’m probably coming from or heading to meetings, either internally or externally. One of my employees the other day said the only time he sees me (he sits next to the door) is when I’m running out, throwing on a coat and muttering to myself about how bad traffic is on the way into Cincinnati.

There are certainly some days where I get things done in the office – days when people don’t need me as much and I can concentrate on auditing financials, or catching up on HR paperwork. But there’s very little time for me to have quiet, and peace, to write all the blogs I want to for Legion, or to do strategic planning, or to just sit with a sheet of blank paper and think about what I want for the company.

And, if I’m being honest, I don’t love those days. My favorite days in the office are when I am needed by a lot of people – when I’m busy all day helping with issues, or people are talking to me about the concert they went to the night before, or I spend the whole day emceeing our Office Olympics, and I go home feeling connected and joyful, because I genuinely love the people who work for me, and I want them to know they can come to me at any time and talk about anything, and I’ll dial in. I don’t want to shut my door and close out the people who depend on me for leadership, but I do need time to do the big things, and to scratch the itch of creating.

So, this week, I’m trying something new. Today, and every Thursday for the foreseeable future, I’m working from home. Right now, I’m typing this on my laptop in my home office, where it is silent, and peaceful, and I don’t have any distractions – no ringing phones, no knocking on the door. I set a goal for myself of how many words I want to write, and which of the big projects (our annual strategic planning retreat, for example) I want to work on. I’m still available by email and phone and text and carrier pigeon, and some of my employees threatened to drive to my house and stand in my home office, but this arrangement is supposed to allow me to be physically present in the office four days a week and spend one day working intensely on the stuff that feeds my soul and makes the work of Legion as rewarding as the people.

I was nervous to tell everyone at the office that I was doing this, because I didn’t want them to think two things – first, that I was just taking today as a blow-off day to drink coffee and watch Netflix, and second, that I didn’t want to be around them. But everyone totally gets it. They see what my days look like, and I think they understand that sometimes, you just need some peace and quiet. Plus, I allow my folks to have ultimate flexibility in their schedules, so I’m not doing something that I wouldn’t allow employees to do. (My IT manager works from home two days a week because it’s the only time he can program in peace.)

Working from home is an experiment. It’s an experiment in time management and discipline for me, and an experiment to see how much more of the “big stuff” I can get done in a week when I’m focused and uninterrupted. I’m excited to see how it goes, and I’m determined to make it work, so that I can have the perspective that I don’t go to work to “work” – I go there to be present for all the people who count on me.

 

By Lacy Starling, President and Fearless Leader

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Preparing for Career Fairs https://jointhelegion.com/preparing-for-career-fairs/ Fri, 14 Sep 2018 16:51:08 +0000 http://jointhelegion.com/?p=5340 With summer coming to an end and school beginning, career fairs are right around the corner. Whether you attend career fairs as a requirement, for extra credit, or because it’s sounds good, they are extremely important tools for your job search. Career Fairs were a huge part of my life in college because it is …

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With summer coming to an end and school beginning, career fairs are right around the corner. Whether you attend career fairs as a requirement, for extra credit, or because it’s sounds good, they are extremely important tools for your job search.

Career Fairs were a huge part of my life in college because it is where I found three out of my four internships while attending the University of Cincinnati. I wanted to share a few tips with you that allowed me to feel prepared and confident when heading to a career fair:

·Know Your Stuff – Find the online directory of the career fair online, and research the companies you are interested in working for. Plan a route that you want to follow. The first company you speak with should be a company you have no interest in (to shake off the nerves).

·Resume – I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen students walk up to a company representative at a career fair and not have copies of their resume. That gives a terrible first impression before even beginning your elevator pitch.

·Dress – Even if they say you can wear business casual… DON’T! Dress for the job you dream of not for the job you would settle for. Employers get excited when they see our generation take the time to dress up and look professional.

·Check-In – Make sure to grab a map, as well as double checking to make sure it appears the same way as it did online.

·Take Notes – Be engaged, ask questions, and take notes! Employers love when they see you taking notes on their company and being 100 percent engaged. They love when their time is valued.

·Respect the Free Stuff – When a recruiter offers you a stadium cup, a pen, or some other cool company swag, be sure to always take it. Some recruiters may take it as an insult if you say no.

Career Fairs will never go away, and people will always need to find a way to get noticed, besides browsing the internet to submit resumes. This is why it is important to be prepared and be confident walking into your next career fair.

By Kyle Kosco, Marketing Coordinator & Director of Internships

The post Preparing for Career Fairs appeared first on Legion Logistics.

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